ExSilent Ytango Is First Behind-The-Ear Hearing Aid To Place Both Microphone And Speaker In The Ear Canal

ExSilent Ytango Hearing Aid

ExSilent's Ytango Hearing Is First BTE To Integrate Microphone And Speaker In The Ear

ExSilent, an independent hearing aid company which was an early entrant in the invisible hearing aid market, has expanded its product line with the Ytango, the first behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid to integrate both the microphone and speaker in an earpiece that sits within the ear canal.

By placing the microphone with the speaker in the ear canal while letting the small unit that sits on the ear handle all the digital sound processing tasks, the Ytango lets the concha and the ear canal provide the ear’s more natural acoustic sound-enhancing properties. The patented design enables the wearer to better pinpoint where sound comes from, experience less wind noise and better understand conversation in noisy situations.

ExSilent calls its new technology “MaRIC,” for Microphone and Receiver in the Canal. Many other companies have put the hearing aid’s speaker (receiver) in the ear canal, but none to date have also put the microphone there in a behind-the-ear device. In addition to acoustic benefits, eliminating the microphone from the behind-the-ear processor unit reduces its size and improves its cosmetic appeal. The module in the ear fits deeply, so it is nearly invisible as well. ExSilent has also developed a new soft dome that, like other manufacturers’ receiver-in-the-canal products, does not require a custom ear mold impression.

A Ytango Pro model adds AirTAP™, another technology first from ExSilent that was first introduced on its Qleaf Pro CIC in February 2011. AirTAP lets you select programs with a slight touch or pat on ear. The AirTAP switch lets users move smoothly through four personal preset programs to adapt to different listening situations. The Ytango Pro-T also adds a telecoil, that transfers signals from mobile phones, MP3 players and other audio equipment, through a Bluetooth-enabled neck loop directly into the user’s hearing aids.

ExSilent is demonstrating the Ytango at the American Academy of Audiology (AAA) AudiologyNOW conference in Chicago this week and will start shipping the new product this spring. At a show marked by fewer major new technologies and new-product introductions from hearing aid manufacturers than in previous years, the new ExSilent Ytango behind-the-ear hearing aid should stand out.

Comments

  1. Chris says

    Wow. Very Interesting. In addition to the moisture issues, I would be concerned about the amount of available gain without feedback.

  2. says

    ExSilent Ytango did a great job placing both microphone and speaker in the ear canal. I’ve worked on a Hearing Technology company in New Zealand and your blog is very essential to us. Thanks for sharing this up.

  3. says

    Beautiful post. I’m storing it away too as this is a day I keep preparing for in my mind but know, I’ll never be fully prepared. The thing with an analog hearing aid is that it picks up the loudest sound available which can be both a good or bad thing. The module in the ear fits deeply, so it is nearly invisible as well. Excellent has also developed a new soft dome that, like other manufacturers’ receiver-in-the-canal products, does not require a custom ear mold impression. It will just have to come from the heart. Thanks for sharing with us..

  4. says

    This is the great blog,And This should really help with wind noise.And great information about the ExSilent Ytango Is First Behind-The-Ear Hearing Aid To Place Both Microphone And Speaker In The Ear Canal. the Ytango lets the concha and the ear canal provide the ear’s more natural acoustic sound-enhancing properties.
    digital hearing aids

  5. Mel Mackay says

    Confused by MaRIC? ….. more alphabet soup! The maker’s researchers claim “Unlike a traditional RIC, a new microphone and receiver in the canal (MaRiC) design …..”.

    Is this really a new design? Surly the large branch of micro hearing aids that are located “in” the ear, as distinct from “behind” it, have always had both the microphone and receiver together? Am I missing something???

    Is this not just a case of ExSilent who, up until now have only offered “in” ear devices, extending their product range by relocating the battery and processor and so, have easily gained a presence in the BTE market?

    The researchers go on “It has long been known that, when the microphone is moved from the top of the ear (as in BTEs) to somewhere inside the auricle (as in ITEs), a high frequency boost occurs, as the auricle acts as a natural acoustic preamplifier—with potential benefits in directivity and localization”.

    I find this an attractive argument …. not only for ExSilent’s Ytango but all ITEs …. but don’t know how much weighting to put on this benefit …… it may be very marginal.

    I’m shopping for a premium wireless hearing aid and finding it difficult to choose even which branch of design alternatives to follow. Review comments usually just tell us about the feature level included without a hint of how useful that is to users or how well it works.

    Users here in the UK get good middle-of-the-road digital hearing aids provided by the government Health Service without a charge, so the whole price of a premium aid needs to be justified by how well the premium features make a difference.

    Is there a path for inquisitive people like me to follow to make a selection? Buying these things is such an expensive business that it can only be done infrequently, so maybe we can’t expect much customer savvy to develop …… and so we live in relative ignorance.

    My requirements list in order of importance …..

    § Best possible access to human speech in varied situations.
    § Supports use with BeoCom 5 and BeoCom 6000 landline phones.
    § Reliable.
    § Works with mobile phones.
    § Supports “private” TV volume increase in three rooms.
    § No fiddly button sequencing to remember.
    § Requires little (or no) ongoing routine service attention.

    Advice would be appreciated.

  6. says

    Hi David,

    This should really help with wind noise. I wonder how they will address moisture issues? If they’re smart they will release data on repair rates if moisture is not an issue.

    Sandra

  7. Jeff Hall says

    Hi David,

    Just wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your blog, thanks for all your hard work. I work in the hearing industry and I bookmarked your blog to keep myeup to date on all the latest happenings! Thanks a ton!

    Jeff

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *